Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last few weeks.

The Archives Blog had a post called “Use Your Ancestor’s Social History to Your Advantage.” To understand the life of your ancestor you need to understand the times in which they lived. This is where understanding the various forms of social history can be helpful.

The Genealogy Canada blog has a post entitled “Some land records are being digitized.” This is good news and is part of the Canadiana.org Heritage Project. One of the first projects is the “Heir and Devisee Commission of the Upper Canada (Ontario) Land Records.” You can access an index to the Second Heir and Devisee records on the Archives of Ontario website.

The National Library of Ireland blog has a post called “Looking after your Family Archives – prevention is better than cure…” This post provides some very useful information on preserving the paper in your family archives.

The Ontario Genealogical Society blog has a post called “Profile: Current OGS Projects: Cemeteries” which looks at the cemetery project being done by the OGS and its branches over the last 30 years. There are links here to help you access the information.

The Ancestry Insider blog has a post entitled “Lessons Learned from WDYTYA at #FGS2013” This post is about the FGS breakfast hosted by Ancestry.com on Saturday morning. It looks at how the program “Who Do You Think You Are?” can be used to help engage people in family history. It is very interesting reading.

John Grenham’s Irish Times post called “The Cowboy and the Farmer should be friends” first made me think of the Rodgers and Hammerstein production of Oklahoma. But reading further it should read “The Historian and the Genealogist should be friends” and how the availability of records may help.

The Genealogy Insider has a post entitled “PBS Series “Genealogy Roadshow” Explores Roots of Everyday Americans.” This post provides more information on the upcoming show and a short clip. I am glad that PBS picked up this RTÉ program. They are already in their second season.

Irish Genealogy News has a post called “Guide to Genealogy Resources in Donegal.” You can download the 32 page booklet by following the link in their post.

Anglo-Celtic Connection has a post called “LAC’s 2007 blunder.” Is there any way of protecting our history from LAC?

The National Archives blog has a post entitled “The gloves are off” where they say that in some cases wearing the white cotton gloves can damage documents.

The Olive Tree Genealogy blog has a post called “All Our Relations on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.” This is a new family history series being shown in Canada.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

There are three posts of interest from Irish Genealogy News. The first is “Mount Lawrence cemetery: Phase 1 completes August” which is about the Limerick City Archives project to release the digitized burial registers for Mount Lawrence cemetery.

The next is “SeanRuad Townland Database has moved.” This is a very useful online database and thankfully someone has decided to host all the hard work of the late John Broderick.

The last post is “Familiar faces return to NAI Genealogy Service.” This is about the new consortium that has been created to provide a free genealogy advice service at the National Archives of Ireland. It was created by professional genealogists who had worked in the previous version of the Genealogy Service.

Dick Eastman is alerting us to “GenScriber 2.1.1” a free program for Windows to help transcribe many different kinds of records relating to your family history research.

John Grenham’s Irish Roots column in the Irish Times is called “Breaking up” and refers to the move of the GRO research room in Dublin.

This Intrepid Band has a post called “The ‘Burnt Records’” and it is a list of records that were destroyed the night the German’s bombed London in 1940. This is a very useful research tool for anyone researching the Great War in Britain.

The Empire Called and I Answered has a post called “Military periodicals online” which refers to the Army Lists from the British government. You can find a list of the periodicals to be found online at the Fibiwiki. FIBI is the Families in British India Society and they are very active in preserving documents.

Library and Archives Canada Blog has a posted entitled “The 1940 National Registration File” and this is a treasure not many people know about. I have used this several times and found some information that helped break down a few walls. Carefully read what is required to get a copy of the document.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

John Grenham’s Irish Times column is entitled “Six tactics of the successful researcher:” We all need to be using John’s six tactics when we do our research.

The Genea-Musings blog has a post announcing Thomas MacEntee’s latest resource called “Hack Genealogy” Website Announcement.” Thomas has done it again. What would we do without him?

There are three posts regarding the move of the GRO research room in Dublin. British GENES has a post called “GRO Dublin search room to move” and Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter has a post called “General Register Office’s Dublin Research Room to Move to an “Appalling Location.” The final word, at the moment, goes to the Irish Genealogy News blog post called “GRO’s relocation is a ‘temporary’ one, we’re to believe.” Obviously we don’t. The move of the GRO research room from the lovely location in the Irish Life Centre to the not so lovely old dole office on Werburgh street does not seem to fit with the money the Irish government has spent on the Gathering and other tourism events to get the Irish Diaspora to come home and research their family history. I would not want to research in the old dole office.

Findmypast is in the news twice. The first is Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter with a post called “PERSI Finds New Home on FindMyPast.com” It seems that Findmypast has partnered with the Allen County Public Library to update and improve the PERSI experience. They plan to link digitized articles to the index references. This is great news.

The second post is on the Anglo-Celtic Connections blog entitled “Finally…Findmypast adds Canadian resources.” John Reid has listed the nearly 200 Canadian resources available on Findmypast.com

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

Genealogy’s Star had two posts that were of interest. The first is “We don’t need to be genealogists anymore!!! Yippee!” which looks at the author’s reaction to the comment “we don’t need to be genealogists anymore.”

The second post is “Search Historical Newspapers with Elephind.com” which is about a new search engine dedicated to digitized newspapers.

Randy Seaver over at Genea-Musings is looking for help with a Canadian mystery in his family history. You can read more in the post called “My Canadian Mystery – Sarah Sephrona? (Fletcher) Kemp (1802-????)

The Paul Milner Genealogy blog has a post called “Tim Ellis Interview.” Tim Ellis is the Keeper of the Records of Scotland and Registrar General for Scotland.

The Library and Archives blog has a two part series on “How to read AMICUS records.” Part 1. Part 2.

The British GENES blog has two posts of interest. The first has a personal connection for me. “Paisley Abbey 850th anniversary conference” is about a conference being held on 7 Sept 2013 to celebrate Paisley Abbey’s anniversary. Paisley Abbey is the church where three different lines of my ancestor’s worshiped. I just wish I could go to the conference.

The other post is called “1939 National Identity Register (England/Wales) – digitisation test.” Chris found some items of interest in the latest annual report and accounts for 2012-13 for the National Archives at Kew.

John Grenham’s column in the Irish Times is entitled “Trees.” It provides warnings and food for thought.

Irish Genealogy News has a post called “New website and email facilities coming from GRO.” This is great news!

The National Archives of England blog has a post that relates to the imminent arrival of the newest Royal. The post is entitled “A Royal bundle of joy.”

Come Here to Me! has a posted called “Dublin Tenement Life.” There is a Facebook page called “Dublin Tenement Life” that covers inner-city Dublin from the late nineteenth to early twentieth century.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “FamilySearch Image Restrictions” which looks at restrictions on the database images at FamilySearch. This is something we all need to be aware of when we do our research. These are only a few of the restrictions so be sure to read the information about the database before you start your research.

Irish Genealogy News has three items of interest. The first is “NAI issues tender for provision of Genealogy Service.” A tender has been put out by National Archives of Ireland for five researchers to work in the NAI Genealogy Service.

The next is “Remembering the 1913 Lock Out: lecture on video” here she provides a link to a lecture given by Michael D. Higgins, Uachtarán na hÉireann (President of Ireland) called “Remembering the 1913 Lock Out: It’s sources, impact and some lessons.”

The last is “County Clare archives to be placed online, free” which is very good news for all those with Clare ancestors.

The abroad in the yard blog had a post called “Snail DNA reveals ancient human journey from Pyrenees to Ireland 8,000 years ago.” DNA is something everyone has been talking about lately. This is a slightly different take on it as the DNA is from a snail and may have provided the necessary evidence about a migration to Ireland from Iberia “by Mesolithic coast-hugging sea travellers.”

British GENES blog has two posts of interest. The first is “Update on GRO Northern Ireland online records project” and the other is “PRONI User Forum – news highlights from meeting.” Both of these posts provide some interesting information on Northern Ireland research.

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter has a posted called “Please Put the 1921 Canadian Census Online” which is about a letter written to the Toronto Star “Letters to the Editor” section.

The Anglo-Celtic Connections blog has a different view point in a post entitled “Why I’m not signing the e-petitions.”

Geniaus has a post called “Future Family History” where she looks at personal blogs as a way of preserving our family history stories.

Organize Your Family History has a post entitled “Genealogy Roadshow coming to PBS this fall.” More details about the show have been released. This show is in its second season on RTÉ in Ireland. The first season was very successful so let’s hope the same can be said of its American counterpart.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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