Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last couple of weeks.

The British GENES blog has a post entitled “National Records of Scotland website now up and running” which is great news. There is a lot of overlap from the other websites but it is a start.

Chris has another post called “1926 Northern Irish census – officially dead.” It has been confirmed that the census was destroyed in the Second World War. This is so sad as it is the first census after the partition.

There are two blog posts from the FGS Conference News Blog about the upcoming FGS Conference in Fort Wayne Indiana. The first is called “FGS 2013 June Conference Checklist” this is a list of things to make sure you do in June before the August FGS conference. The other is called “4th Conference Hotel Added” they have now added the Hyatt Place Fort Wayne to the list of conference hotels. This means that there is a lot of interest in this conference so start making your plans. I am an FGS Ambassador for the conference.

John Grenham’s Irish Times column has a post entitled “An opportunity missed?” which looks at the value of the Minister of Arts Heritage and the Gaeltacht announcement that the General Register Office indexes will be available online for free. It makes for interesting reading.

The Irish Genealogy News blog has three posts of interest. The first is “National Archives re-indexes online census.” The National Archives of Ireland says they have corrected about 12,600 errors in its online census database that were submitted by users. The site has been updated with the index corrections. Then she put an update which says that the person doing the corrections has moved on and they are on hold again until someone new can be found. I went in when the updates were first announced and noticed the index errors on my 2X Great Grandmother’s name had not be fixed. Then I see the blog update, so fingers crossed it won’t be long now.

The next post is “PRONI marks G8 summit with online exhibition.” I went in and check out the exhibition and it was interesting. Irish documents relating to each of the G8 countries. I so wanted to enlarge the 1864 Canadian passenger list page.

The last post is “Modesty (should) prevent me, but…” A shout out goes to Claire Santry for her mention in John Grenham’s Irish Roots column in the Irish Times. Well done Claire!

The Ancestry Insider has a post called “FamilySearch.org Search Futures” which looks at some upcoming search features.

The We Tree Genealogy Blog had a post entitled “Simplifying Your Online Genealogy Life.” She shares how she simplified her online presence.

Anglo-Celtic Connections has a post called “Ancestry.ca Bonanza” which lists all the new military and other Canadian records that have just been released. These are early records so they are very valuable.

What were your favourite blog posts? Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

This is another long list of favourites. I have been busy getting ready for the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference this weekend. Happy reading everyone.

Irish Genealogy News has several posts of interest. The first is “Too many histories…” Hedge School debate online.” It is the latest podcast from the Hedge School.

The next post is “More Church of Ireland transcriptions go online.” This is the latest release to the Anglican Record Project. The last post is “So what? So plenty!” which is about the Irish Government’s intention to put the civil registration indexes online.

The British GENES blog also has several posts of interest. The first is “Republic of Ireland’s GRO indexes to go online at IrishGenealogy.ie” The next is “1895 Scottish Valuation Roll now online.” The last post is “Scottish Online Catalogue Project” which is going to be a wonderful resource for people researching Scotland.

Chris’ other blog is Scotland: Walking in Eternity and here he had a post called “The Tourist’s Matrimonial Guide Through Scotland.” This is a wonderful post and provides a warning to tourists about Scottish marriage customs.

The “Are My Roots Showing?” blog has a couple of good posts. The first is “Evidentia and Mastering Genealogical Proof” where she looks at how the program Evidentia has been adapting to the release of Thomas W. Jones’ book “Mastering Genealogical Proof.” The second post is “My Digital Filing System for Genealogy (Windows).” This came about via the new group on Facebook called “The Organized Genealogist.” I think we are all looking for ways to organize our collections and doing it right the first time.

Dick Eastman had a post called “Save Library & Archives Canada: How Ordinary Citizens can Make an Impact.” If you want to make an impact then check this out.

The Genealogy Canada blog has a post called “Want to track down descendants of immigrants who were on the Empress of Ireland.” If you had people on the Empress of Ireland when it went down in the St. Lawrence River on 29 May 1914 then you need to read this post.

John Grenham’s has a column entitled “Genealogy in Time” where he looks at the ranking system of genealogy websites. He starts with Genealogy in Time which is a Canadian website and says it is ranked as the fifth largest family history website in the world.

GeneaPress announces that “Southern California Genealogy Jamboree: Free Live-Streamed Sessions Announced.” Sign up now to attend the free live streamed sessions from Jamboree.

The Genealogy’s Star blog had a post called “2,000,000,000th Holding Record goes into WorldCat.org.” If you haven’t used WorldCat.org then you need to go and check it out.

The Anglo-Celtic Connections blog had an interested post called “The First 20 Hours – How to Learn Anything.” It is an interesting video.

The last blog post is from a blog I follow not because of genealogy but because of a general interest. They had a post this week that crossed general interest with genealogy. The post entitled “Simply Divine” is about St. Werburgh’s Church in Dublin. This is of interest to me because in the late 1700s my family worshiped there and one collateral ancestor is buried there. I enjoyed the brief history but what really caught my attention was the photographic essay of the church. The last time I was in Dublin the church was closed so I never got to go inside. This helps make up for a missed opportunity but it also makes me more intent on getting in to see it the next time I am in Dublin.

What were your favourite blog posts?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

This week’s favourite blog posts cover a couple of weeks because I was away at the NGS conference in Las Vegas and then took several days in Salt Lake City to do some research.

Abroad in the yard had a post called “Century Chest’ time capsule reveals pristine 100 year-old artefacts and messages for the future.” This was a very interesting post about a time capsule found in an Oklahoma church.

Randy Seaver from Genea-Musings has a post called “Changes to the Evidence Analysis Process Map in GPS.” Looks like there are some changes coming and I am sure more discussion.

This is not exactly a blog post but a friend sent me this link to a newspaper report from The West Australian Regional Newspapers called “Genealogist finally has the answers.” Now I just wish the Family History Society of Rockingham and Districts recorded this presentation so I could know how it turned out.

The Mocavo Genealogy Blog has a post called “Tracking Your Genealogy Library: iBookshelf” this is about an app in iTunes to help you keep track of your genealogical library.

Chris Paton of the British GENES blog is “amused by a small archival storm over in the United States” in the post called “Cataloguing conundrums!” He also has several other posts. The first is “TNA adds digitised naturalisation and denization papers.” These records cover the period from 1801 to 1871 and can be searched at The National Archives in Kew.

Irish wills calendars 1858-1922 now online” is an announcement from the National Archives of Ireland and the addition of this record group to their genealogy platform. It is free to search and view.

WW1 Lantern slides found in Belfast church loft” is about the discovery of 77 lantern slides depicting Belfast soldiers from the First World War. If your ancestor is on one of the 77 slides then what a treasure.

The last of the British GENES posts is “Who Do You Think You Are Live 2014 – change of dates” they have changed the dates for the show next year starting on Thursday 20th February and going to Saturday 22nd February.

The Irish Genealogy News Blog has several posts of interest. The first is “Follow the decade of 100 years ago on Century Ireland.” This post looks at a new website that tells the story of “Ireland’s most tumultuous years: 1912-1923.” It is worth a look.

The next post is “17th-century Ireland revealed in 300-year-old-maps” This is about the Down Survey website and the maps from 1656 to 1658.

The last post is “1926 Irish census moves closer to release?” What I don’t like is the question mark at the end. There may be problems with the private members bill to amend the wording of the Statistics Act.

I am very pleased it is a long weekend in Canada because that means that the Canadian Lib Genie (aka Elise) got to post on Librarians Helping Canadian Genealogists Climb Family Trees. Her post is called “Baptism record that appears to solve mystery of Samuel de Champlain’s birth arrives in Canada.” This post makes me want to take a trip to Ottawa to the Museum of Civilization to view the document and others that mark the 400th anniversary of Samuel de Champlain’s trip up the Ottawa River to the Ottawa Valley.

What were your favourite blog posts?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved 

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last week.

There were three posts from British GENES this week. The first is “Old TNA catalogue to be switched off.” Tomorrow the TNA will start their new Discovery catalogue.

The other two posts were called “Democratising or Privileging archive conference in Dundee” and “Democratising or Privileging archives conference – day 2.” These are two very interesting posts about what he learned at the conference. There were quite a few Canadian archives presenting as well. There is an interesting take of Library and Archives Canada. Library and Archives Canada has lost its reputation on the international stage not to mention at home.

Irish Genealogy News has an interesting post called “Exploring Irish Identity – a free online course.” This looks really interesting and it starts on May 27th.

Congratulations FamilySearch and their dedicated volunteer indexers. You have reached the one billionth indexed record. “Thanks a Billion.”

Genealogy’s Star has an interesting post called “Is Genealogy History or is All History Genealogy?” Every genealogist needs to know about the history of the area where their ancestors lived and the era in which their ancestors lived. It can help answer a lot of questions.

What were your favourite blog posts this past week?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

Genealogy Insider – Genealogy News Corral

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from the last few weeks.

Irish Genealogy News has a post called “Anglican Record Project releases trio of registers.” This is about the latest release from the Church of Ireland digitization project.

John Reid of Anglo-Celtic Connections has a new update on the happenings at Library and Archives Canada with a post entitled “Service at LAC.” You can only view items at LAC but you might not even be able to view them there with the poor upkeep of the microfilm readers.

The National Archives of England blog has a post written by Audrey Collins called “Censuses compared.” Audrey compares census records from the US and Britain.

Kerry Scott of the Clue Wagon blog has been at it again with another wonderful post called “Dead People, Dead People, Dead People, SQUIRREL!” Oh I so agree Kerry.

The Brit-Ish Heritage Forum has a posted called “London Huguenot Record Treasures at FamilySearch” which provides a long list of items at FamilySearch to help you with your Huguenot research.

The British GENES blog has a post called “Irish Family History Event video” which has a video from the first ever Irish Family History Event held in Dublin over the St. Patrick’s Day Festival. There are several other small videos available.

What were your favourite blog posts from the last few weeks?

Let me know in the comments below.

Other bloggers that write their own lists are:

Genea-Musings – Best of the Genea-Blogs

British & Irish Genealogy

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History Blog

©2013 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

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