Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

Marian’s Roots and Rambles had a post called “Data Overload: How to Create a Better System.” Marian realizes that the organizational system she had in place isn’t working as well as it used to so she is looking for advice to help her create a new system.

Help Me With My Family Tree has a post called “Searching for Militia Records.” Nick is sharing some of the things he has learned researching British militia records.

Genea-Musings has a post called “File Sharing and Brick Walls – Russ Examines My Database.” Randy is receiving help from a fellow blogger with one of his brick walls. Russ is sharing the process of using Family Tree Maker 2012 to help solve some of Randy’s brick walls.

Irish Genealogy News provides us with some good news in a post called “1926 census possible online in 2016.” The title says it all but go in and read the post to get further details.

It’s that time of year again and Geneabloggers is having their Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories 2011. A different blog topic relating to Christmas will be posted by participating blogger’s everyday from the first of December through to Christmas Eve.

Are there any postings in the last week that you think need to be on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

The Irish Archives Resource: A Portal for Genealogists Researching Irish Ancestors

The Irish Archives Resource says their site will help researchers “to search for publicly accessible archival collections that are located in Ireland.” There are five tabs to choose for information on the site: Search, About Us, Advice, Family History/Genealogy, Feedback and Links.

The Advice page helps you to get the best results from your searches in the Irish Archives Resource. You can search by keyword, dates, geographical area, collection type or name of repository and collection reference number.

If you click the “Search Results” button at the bottom of the search page then you get a complete listing of the resources catalogued on the site. When I did this I got 214 results and there were twenty results per page. Some of the results referred to a specific item and some to a collection.

There is one reference to a will for Annie Barnacle the mother of Nora Barnacle. Nora was the wife of James Joyce. Annie died in1940 and the will was lost. As the family tried to solve the problem letters were sent back and forth. These letters are the heart of the collection.

There are some collections relating to estates in Ireland. The date range of the collections starts in the 1700s and goes to the current day.

This does not cover all the collections to be found in repositories in Ireland but it does provide a good starting point when your research takes you to Ireland. There are links to the original repository at the end of each collection description.

The Irish Archives Resource catalogue is small at the moment. There are eighteen contributing repositories. When more information is added it will be a wonderful resource. Do not wait until more repositories are added to the Irish Archives Resource, go in now and see what you can find. You might be surprised.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

A Treasure for Those with Leeds West Yorkshire Ancestors

The West Yorkshire Archive Service has a website called “The Leeds Tithe Map Project.” They have digitized and made searchable the tithe maps of what is now the Leeds Metropolitan District. These maps cover the rural and urban townships from 1838 to 1861. They provide a look at land ownership, land occupancy and land use.

These maps were used by the diocesan and parish officials. Several do have a little damage but they are generally in good condition.

The website says you can compare the tithe maps to other historic maps as well as modern and aerial maps. You can search the database by a persons name and examine the land and its uses. There is an option to download maps using customized search options and print full colour selections from the datasets.

There is a guide to using the “Tithe Map Digital Resource” that you can download as a PDF.

The “Leeds Tithe Map Digital Resource” can be searched by specific township, personal name and postcode. You can browse the maps or search by other options. The last one takes you to a search page where you can search for a particular owner or occupier, use a soundex code search or browse by first letter of the last name.

Other search options include advanced search, plot name search and place search.

When you search by last name you get a transcription of the data that includes: township, parish, plot, landowner(s), occupier(s), plot name, land use, acres, roods, and perches. Then there is a link to the map.

You can save as a spreadsheet, show all on the map or clear the search results and try again.

When you click on the map link you get a digital copy of the map with the plot of land outlined in yellow. The tithe map I looked at was from 1836-51. I had the option to look at the Ordnance Survey (OS) c1890, OS c1910 and a large map. Each time the land in question is outlined in yellow.

On the right hand side you have the details of the plot of land that were found in the search. You can access a modern map, aerial map from 2006 and 1999, OS c1800, OS c1910 and plot details which includes the vicars name to whom the tithes are payable.

Under show more you can show owners on map, show land use on map, township boundaries and plot outlines. The last option is highlighted and this takes you back to your highlighted plot of land. There is the ability to print the view of the map you have found.

I enjoy the ability to view a modern aerial view of the plot of land you are researching. This puts it into a more modern perspective with the historic perspective right next to it.

Other resources on the site include the Tithe to 2009 Trails. These contrast the 19th century area with the modern day area. They are downloadable PDF files with the trail marked on a map and there are pictures and descriptions of the area to learn more as you walk the trail.

They have made the tools on the website available as an outreach program to the community so that everyone from school children to seniors can go out and learn more about the area in which they live.

They went out into the community to run Memory Workshops where they talked to the seniors about their memories of the area to as they say “ensure that the hidden histories of communities across Leeds were uncovered and recorded.” This is something that every community should do to preserve their own community histories and memories.

There is a glossary and FAQ page, copyright guidance and useful links and feedback.

This website is a treasure and it is not only useful to family historians with connections to Leeds but is a wonderful piece of history to hand down to future generations.

If you have ancestors in Leeds then this is an excellent free resource to help you place your ancestors in the area.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

Ruth’s Recommendations

Here are my favourite blog posts from this past week.

The Findmypast.ie blog had an interesting post called “Traditional Irish naming patterns” written by Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann. If you have Irish ancestry this is something you definitely have to keep in mind. She uses a case study as an example.

The Ancestry Insider had a post called “Ancestry.com’s Vital-ity” where they share some interesting finds in a new release of databases.

Marian Pierre-Louis of Marian’s Roots and Rambles had a post called “The Mystery Heirloom has Arrived!” Don’t we all wish we had an heirloom like that arrive at our door!

Amy Coffin of The We Tree Genealogy Blog has shared her experiences in self publishing The Big Genealogy Blog Book with a post called “Self Publishing Your Genealogy Work: My Experience.”

The Untold Lives blog of the British Library had a post this past week called “Indian princess in suffragette march” Princess Sophia Duleep Singh was a member of the Women’s Social and Political Union and was a well-known suffragette. This is part of her story.

This week is Thanksgiving for my US readers so here is “A History of the Humble Pumpkin Pie” from Christina Morin at Pue’s Occurrences The Irish History Blog.

Are there any postings in the last week that you think need to be on this list? Let me know in the comments below.

©2011 – Blair Archival Research All Rights Reserved

1 2 3